Top 10 Networking Tips For Job Seekers

In the spirit of Late Night with David Letterman, here is my Top 10 List for Job Seekers.

10) Get out of the house. Hey, you can’t effectively conduct a job search from your home office.  Get away from the computer and go talk to somebody. Now! (Do that often enough and you won’t need to read the rest of this top 10 list.)

9) Remember, networking is NOT about YOU!  Shine your shoes.  Even if you are just running to the 7-11 for a Slurpee, you want to dress like a professional.  You never know who you are going to meet when you are out.

7) Have a great elevator pitch.

6) Have plenty of Business Cards / Contact Cards on hand.

5) Be memorable, and I mean this in a good way!  One guy always wears a red sweater to these events.  Then, when he contacts someone later he says, I’m the guy in the red sweater you met last week at the networking meeting. He’s pretty hard to forget!

4) Check your teeth before you leave the house.  You don’t want some yucky-green thing stuck between your teeth!  Bad first impression! (see #8)

3) Spend at least 90% of your time at a networking event listening and asking questions.  Remember #9, networking is NOT about YOU.

2) Go where the action is.  Lots of job seekers hang out in groups with other job seekers.  While thats a good place to start and practice your elevator pitch, sooner or later you need to show up someplace where people who would hire you hang out.

and the number 1 tip for job seekers is . . . .

1) Have fun!  My good friend Cleon Cox III has a motto which goes like this:, Have fun, meet people, and learn something.  I agree!

Also, use career coaching online platform!

Should we treat others as we want to be treated? Not always.

So the Golden Rule goes something like this:  treat others as you want to be treated.  But there is a classic problem with this formulation what if you want to be treated in perverse ways?  We can call this the Problem of Perverse Desires.  What if I, for example, like being spanked by strangers in public?  Does that mean that I can do this to others?  I’d be treating them the way I want to be treated

How should we deal with this problem?  There are two strategies.  First, one can use the Golden Rule as a general rule of thumb.  A moral rule that will get you the right answer most of the time (unless you have really messed up desires.)

Second, one can elevate the level of abstraction.  Perhaps in the spanking case above one may respond with something like:  the person who likes being spanked should not infer that it is okay to spank others, rather he should infer that he ought not to do to other people what they dislike.  The principle that the odd spanker should get from reflection on the Golden Rule is something like:  don’t touch other people unless they want it.  This may be a generally good principle, but it is very different from the original formulation of the Golden Rule.  There is no reference, for example, to the desires of the person making the moral choice.

In general, I think that the first approach is the  best option.  This principle should be taken as a general heuristic which will usually give you the right moral answer but not always.

Don’t let your sins eat you!